March 10, 2015

September Featured Resource—Biblical Theology

Biblical Theology Cover

Publisher’s Description

The aim of this book is no less than to provide an account of the unfolding of the mind of God in history, through the successive agents of his special revelation. Vos handles this under three main divisions: the Mosaic epoch of revelation, the prophetic epoch of revelation, and the New Testament.

Such an historical approach is not meant to supplant the work of the systematic theologian; nevertheless, the Christian gospel is inextricably bound up with history, and the biblical theologian thus seeks to highlight the uniqueness of each biblical document in that succession. The rich variety of Scripture is discovered anew as the progressive development of biblical themes is explicated.

To read these pages- the fruit of Vos’s 39 years of teaching biblical theology at Princeton- is to appreciate the late John Murray’s suggestion that Geerhardus Vos was the most incisive exegete in the English-speaking world of the twentieth century.

About the Author

Theologian, author, and long-time Professor of Biblical Theology at Princeton Theological Seminary, Geerhardus Johannes Vos was born in March, 1862 at Heerenveen, Netherlands. Raised in a pious home – his father was a minister in the Christelijke-Gereformeerde Kerk – Vos graduated from Amsterdam Gymnasium in 1881. When his father accepted a call to be the pastor of the Christian Reformed Church congregation in Grand Rapids, Michigan, the family immigrated to the United States.

Vos studied at the Theologische School (later renamed Calvin Theological Seminary) in Grand Rapids, Michigan, from 1881 to 1883 and afterwards at Princeton Theological Seminary (1883-85). Upon graduation from Princeton, he studied abroad at the University of Berlin (1885-86) and the University of Strasburg, where he was awarded a Ph.D in Arabic Studies (1888). Although Herman Bavinck and Abraham Kuyper tried to convince Vos to become professor of Old Testament Theology at the Free University in Amsterdam, he returned to the United States, and served as Professor of Didactic and Exegetical Theology at the Theologische School from 1888 to 1893.

At the persistence of William Henry Green, Vos moved to Princeton Theological Seminary in 1893 to serve as the school’s first Professor of Biblical Theology. The following year he married Catherine Frances Smith of Grand Rapids, Michigan, and they set up home on the campus of the Seminary, in a spacious house provided for Seminary professors. Teaching now dominated Vos’s life, although he also preached occasionally—mostly in the chapel of the Seminary on Sunday afternoons (the book Grace and Glory published by the Trust contains 16 of his sermons).

A prolific author, Vos’s published writings include articles, essays, reviews, poems, and biblical-theological studies on both Old and New Testament topics. The Teaching of Jesus Concerning the Kingdom of God (1903) and his study of Pauline theology, The Pauline Eschatology (1930), remain two of his most important works. Vos’s approach to the theology of the Old and New Testaments was published in 1948 as Biblical Theology (reprinted by the Trust in 1975).

Vos retired from Princeton in 1932 and spent his remaining days in Pennsylvania, California, and Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he died in August, 1949. His wife Catherine – who authored the well-known Child’s Story Bible – pre-deceased him in 1937, after 43 years of marriage. Their earthly remains are buried together in the tiny village of Roaring Branch, Pennsylvania, a rural community in the central part of the State, where they spent many quiet and enjoyable summer months together throughout the years of their marriage.

Book Details

426 Pages
Publisher: Banner of Truth
Publication Date: March 1975
ISBN 10: 0851514588
ISBN 13: 9780851514581

(HT: WTSBooks)

July 26, 2021

The Rise and Triumph of the Modern Self: Cultural Amnesia, Expressive Individualism, and the Road to Sexual Revolution

From Crossway Books:

Modern culture is obsessed with identity. Since the landmark Obergefell v. Hodges Supreme Court decision in 2015, sexual identity has dominated both public discourse and cultural trends—yet no historical phenomenon is its own cause. From Augustine to Marx, various views and perspectives have contributed to the modern understanding of the self.

In this timely book, Carl Trueman analyzes the development of the sexual revolution as a symptom—rather than the cause—of the human search for identity. Trueman surveys the past, brings clarity to the present, and gives guidance for the future as Christians navigate the culture in humanity’s ever-changing quest for identity.

Dr. Carl Trueman

Carl R. Trueman (PhD, University of Aberdeen) is professor of biblical and religious studies at Grove City College. He is an esteemed church historian and previously served as the William E. Simon Fellow in Religion and Public Life at Princeton University. Trueman has authored or edited more than a dozen books, including The Creedal ImperativeLuther on the Christian Life; and Histories and Fallacies. Trueman is a member of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church.

May 1, 2021

Recovering the Lost Art of Reading: A Quest for the True, the Good, and the Beautiful

Book Description

A Christian Perspective on the Joys of Reading

Reading has become a lost art. With smartphones offering us endless information with the tap of a finger, it’s hard to view reading as anything less than a tedious and outdated endeavor. This is particularly problematic for Christians, as many find it difficult to read even the Bible consistently and attentively. Reading is in desperate need of recovery.

Recovering the Lost Art of Reading addresses these issues by exploring the importance of reading in general as well as studying the Bible as literature, offering practical suggestions along the way. Leland Ryken and Glenda Faye Mathes inspire a new generation to overcome the notion that reading is a duty and instead discover it as a delight.

About the Authors

Leland Ryken (PhD, University of Oregon) served as professor of English at Wheaton College for nearly fifty years. He has authored or edited over fifty books, including The Word of God in English and A Complete Handbook of Literary Forms in the Bible. He is a frequent speaker at the Evangelical Theological Society’s annual meetings and served as literary stylist for the English Standard Version Bible.

Glenda Faye Mathes (BLS, University of Iowa) is a professional writer with a passion for literary excellence. She has authored over a thousand articles and several nonfiction books as well as the Matthew in the Middle fiction series. Glenda has been the featured speaker at women’s conferences and at seminars for prison inmates.

March 2, 2021

Presbytopia: What it Means to be Presbyterian

Book Description

When people visit churches, they come with questions. What do you believe about the Bible? How are you different from the church down the street? Why should I become a member of a Presbyterian Church? These are important questions, and questions that sometimes Presbyterians don’t even know the answer to! Ken Golden considers the distinctives of being a Presbyterian, the basis for making a profession of faith and the role of the church as a means of grace.

~from back cover
Pastor Ken Golden

About the Author

Pastor Ken Golden grew up in a nominal Jewish home in New Jersey. He studied art and worked in the pharmaceutical industry before his conversion in 1996. After exploring different churches, Pastor Ken was drawn to the Reformed tradition. He eventually went onto study at Westminster Seminary California, receiving his Masters of Divinity in 2005. He was ordained the same year and pastored an OPC congregation before coming to Sovereign Grace OPC in 2011. Pastor Ken and his wife Cressid have been married since 1992. Their children are Samuel, Joseph, Aaron, and Maelah.

http://sovgraceopc.org/people/pastor-ken-golden/

  • 144 pages
  • Paperback
  • Revised 2016, Christian Focus

March 1, 2020

With All Your Heart: Orienting Our Mind, Desires and Will Toward Christ

With All Your Heart CoverBook Description

In our world, we use the word heart to refer to our emotions. But the Bible uses the word heart to refer to the governing center of life. We need to grasp the true meaning of the heart in order to better understand ourselves, our sin, and our need for redemption. As we rediscover the heart as the source of all our thoughts, fears, words, and actions, we will discover principles and practices for orienting our hearts to truly love and obey God with all that we are.

A Craig Troxel

Dr. A. Craig Troxel

About the Author

A. Craig Troxel (PhD, Westminster Theological Seminary) is professor of practical theology at Westminster Seminary California. He previously served as pastor of Bethel Orthodox Presbyterian Church in Wheaton, IL and Calvary Presbyterian Church (OPC) in Glenside, PA.

224 Pages
Paperback
2020 Crossway Books

 

February 1, 2020

Covenants Made Simple

Covenants Made Simple CoverBook Description

What do the various covenants given throughout the Bible mean to us? Are they relevant to our lives? A rainbow now and then may remind us of God’s promise to Noah, and we’ve memorized the part about the new covenant in Jesus’ blood at communion—but do we dig any deeper? Do we need to?

Jonty Rhodes guides us into an engaging study of covenant theology and why it matters. With clarity and wit, he shows us how covenants carry the Bible’s story from start to finish and ultimately give root to the gospel of salvation by grace. Beginning with Adam in the garden of Eden, and ending with Jesus, our risen Covenant King, Rhodes illuminates the good news of a promise-making, promise-keeping God.

Key topics include law and grace, union with Christ, baptism in the Spirit, predestination, and water baptism. Rediscover the Bible’s unified covenantal story and its unfolding message throughout Scripture.

Rhodes Jonty

Rev. Jonty Rhodes

About the Author

Jonty Rhodes (BA, Nottingham University; DipTh. Oakhill Theological College) is Minister of Christ Church Derby (International Presbyterian Church) in the United Kingdom. In his spare time he enjoys watching or playing a good game of cricket.

192 Pages
Paperback
Publisher: P&R Publishing
Publication Date: 2014

 

January 28, 2020

The End Times Made Simple

End Times Made Simple CoverBook Description

Rapture? Pre-Trib? Post-Trib? Millenium? Confused? You should be! In today’s Evangelical Christian world, eschatology―or the study of the “last things”―has been turned into a sort of pseudo-science with a plethora of authors claiming to know exactly the scenario of events that are to take place just prior to the Lord Jesus Christ’s return. Samuel Waldron’s thesis is that there is This Age, and The Age to Come. We will be, or are, in either one or the other. Any “End Times” system that forms a hybrid of these two, or contradicts this simple formula, is unbiblical, and should be rejected.

Waldron Sam

Dr. Sam Waldron

About the Author

Dr. Sam Waldron is the president of CBTS and professor of Systematic Theology. He is also one of the pastors of Grace Reformed Baptist Church in Owensboro, KY. Dr. Waldron received a B.A. from Cornerstone University, an M.Div. from Trinity Ministerial Academy, a Th.M. from Grand Rapids Theological Seminary, and a Ph.D. from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. From 1977 to 2001 he was a pastor of the Reformed Baptist Church of Grand Rapids, MI. Dr. Waldron is the author of numerous books including A Modern Exposition of the 1689 Baptist Confession of Faith, The End Times Made Simple, Baptist Roots in America, To Be Continued?, and MacArthur’s Millennial Manifesto: A Friendly Response.

Paperback
250 Pages
Publisher: Calvary Press
Publication Date: 2007

 

November 7, 2019

God’s Ambassadors: The Westminster Assembly and the Reformation of the English Pulpit, 1643-1653

Gods Ambassadors CoverBook Description

The Westminster Assembly is celebrated for its doctrinal standards and debates on church polity. But how often is the assembly noted for its extraordinary intervention in the pulpit ministry of the Church of England? In God’s Ambassadors, Chad Van Dixhoorn recounts the Puritan quest for a reformation in preachers and preaching and how the Westminster Assembly fit into that movement. He examines the assembly’s reform efforts, tracing debates and exploring key documents about preaching in a way that both highlights disagreements within the assembly’s ranks and showcases their collective plan for the church going forward.

Moreover, Van Dixhoorn reveals the rationale behind the assembly’s writings and reforms, both in terms of biblical exegesis and practical theology. Unlike any other book, God’s Ambassadors draws attention to the lengths to which the Westminster Assembly would go in promoting godly preachers and improved preaching.

Chad Van Dixhoorn (1)About the Author

Dr. Chad Van Dixhoorn (PhD, Cambridge University) is professor of church history and director of the Craig Center for the study of the Westminster Standards at Westminster Theological Seminary. He also serves as an honorary research fellow at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK.

Van Dixhoorn has held a number of additional teaching positions and has also served as associate pastor at Cambridge Presbyterian Church (UK) and also at Grace Presbyterian Church (Vienna, VA) for nine years.

Dr. Van Dixhoorn’s academic interests include the historical documents of the Westminster Assembly, English Puritanism, and Presbyterian history. He has been widely recognized for his publication of a five-volume work on the Westminster Assembly, The Minutes and Papers of the Westminster Assembly, 1643–1652, and has published numerous articles on a variety of theological topics. He is currently working on a major monograph on the Westminster Assembly, as well as a complete edition of John Lightfoot’s journals. Both volumes are to be published by Oxford University Press.

Hardcover
240 Pages
Publication Date: June 2017
Reformation Heritage Books

 

October 23, 2019

Announcement: New Church Podcast Now Available

425a8e2e-290b-4630-99d4-ef66908d3ecdWith of our new church website hosted by http://www.Wix.com, comes new tools to help us bring the recordings of our sermons and adult Sunday school lessons to you. See our newly designed Podcast page at www.mcopc.org/podcast.
As of Thursday, October 17, the new podcast has been approved by services most of us use, such as Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, and even Spotify. There are even more sites where you can subscribe, and you can select from them at the host site for our new podcast, www.anchor.fm/mcopc.
Currently, we are working on repopulating the feed with past sermons dating all the way back to 2009, so new sermons should be being added daily, in most cases. I will announce when a complete set from a past year has been completed. So far, we have Pastor Troutman’s series on Ruth and Galatians, although some sermons are missing 😢. The series on the book of Matthew will begin being added over the weekend.
After the past sermons are repopulated, we will move on to interspersing the past Sunday school series in chronological order throughout the feed. Be sure to check for “Previous Episode” on your podcast player from time to time to see what past material has been added. We will notify you when each phase is complete, and we hope this assists you in hiding God’s word in your heart, and perhaps enables you to assist friends and family of your own who may have a need. Feel free to share the sermons and lessons that are meaningful to you on your own social media sites.
If you choose not to follow podcasts, the messages are always available on the Podcast page of the church website as mentioned above. If you would prefer to be provided with a CD copy of the sermons and CD’s, please let either our “Web Assistant” Daniel Garlow or myself know, and we will be glad to help you with that.
September 9, 2019

Choosing the Good Portion: Women of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church

Choosing the Good Portion CoverBook Description

Choosing the Good Portion tells the story of the OPC through profiles of more than 90 women who sacrificed and served during the last 80 years to help mold the OPC into what it is today. The stories feature missionary wives, pastors’ wives, the spouses of seminary professors, single women, those who contributed financially or behind the scenes to their congregations or denomination, those who helped to start churches, taught VBS, ministered to different cultures, struggled in their faith, offered hospitality, lost a husband or child, and those who were in danger or died. Plus so much more.

By sharing the stories of these ordinary women, we hope to encourage the next generation of OPC women in their service.

The book’s title comes from the story of Mary and Martha. While Martha sought to serve Jesus and his disciples by preparing a large meal, Mary appears to have stopped helping Martha to sit at Christ’s feet and learn from him. Jesus tells Martha that Mary “chose the good portion.”

We believe the women in this book also chose first to receive from Christ what he teaches and then to apply what they learned in service to his church.

About the Authors

Patricia E. Clawson, a former reporter, is the editorial assistant for New Horizons in the Orthodox Presbyterian Church. She is a member of Calvary OPC in Glenside, Pennsylvania.

Diane L. Olinger is a lawyer who serves as a copy editor for Ordained Servant, an online monthly magazine for OPC officers. She is a member of Calvary OPC in Glenside, Pennsylvania.

Hardcover
470 pages
Publisher: The Committee for the Historian of the Orthodox Presbyterian Church Publication Date: 2016
ISBN: 978-0-9833580-6-0

 

July 27, 2019

The Books and the Parchments

Cover Books and Parchments Book Description

“One thing that has impressed itself upon me time and again” writes Dr. Bruce in his preface to this, the third edition of his famous work, “has been the wealth of fresh discovery that has had to be recorded during these last few years.”

In these chapters on the transmission of Bible, the Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis in the University of Manchester, England, presents for layman and student alike the results of the latest research and discovery in such fields as the languages of the Bible, the scripts in which they were written, the chief surviving manuscripts (including the Dead Sea Scrolls), the Canon of Scripture, the original text, the ancient versions, and the story of the English Bible, including some account of the New English Bible. Those who wish to have an up-to-date account of these varying aspects of Bible study within the compass of one volume will find their need met here. ~ from the dust jacket.

Frederick Fyvie Bruce (1910-1990) was a Biblical scholar who taught at a variety of universities and was editor of The Evangelical Quarterly and the Palestine Exploration Quarterly. He wrote a number of influential books, such as Jesus and Christian Origins Outside the New Testament, Are the New Testament Documents Reliable?, New Testament History, The Defense of the Gospel in the New Testament, etc.

He wrote in the Preface to this 1950 book, “This volume gathers together a number of articles written and papers read at various times on the transmission of the Bible. It is intended for non-specialists like those who have read them or heard them in their earlier forms, and who have frequently expressed a desire to have them in this form… I have tried to bear in mind the questions which are most frequently asked about these matters, and to answer them to the best of my ability. I hope that the volume may thus prove interesting and useful to the many who, without aiming at any specialist knowledge of Biblical learning, would welcome a handbook dealing with these questions.”

He points out, “Much of the vivid, concrete and forthright character of our English Old Testament is really a carrying over into English of something of the genius of the Hebrew tongue. Biblical Hebrew does not deal with abstractions but with the facts of experience. It is the right sort of language for the record of the self-revelation of a God who does not make Himself known by philosophical propositions but by controlling and intervening in the course of human history. Hebrew is not afraid to use daring anthropomorphisms when speaking of God. If God imparts to men the knowledge of Himself, he chooses to do so most effectively in terms of human life and human language.” (Pg. 45)

He observes, “a writer like Luke… commanded a good, idiomatic Greek style. Even in the English translation it is difficult to miss the transition in style which takes place between the fourth and fifth verses of his Gospel. From the fifth verse of his first chapter to the end of his second chapter we might be reading a continuation of the Old Testament, so reminiscent is the style of his nativity narratives of the characteristic phraseology of the Old Testament. Some scholars have supposed that for these nativity narratives Luke was dependent on a Hebrew document. This is possible—indeed, it seems to the writer more likely—but it is also possible that Luke was simply composing deliberately in ‘Septuagint’ style because he judged that most appropriate for the subject-matter of these two chapters.” (Pg. 71)

He notes, “It is sometimes claimed that the criterion which the early Christians applied in deciding whether a book was to be regarded as canonical or not was that of apostolic authorship. Now, it is certain that apostolic authorship counted for very much. It was for this reason that such a flood of apocryphal literature appears in the second century bearing the names of various apostles… And there is no example of a certainly apostolic writing being refused canonical recognition… But apostolic authorship, though an important factor, was not the only ground of canonicity. It is probably a mistake to think that we owe the presence of the Epistle to the Hebrews in our Bibles entirely to the happy accident that it was popularly ascribed to Paul. For, after all, two of the Gospels bear the names of men who were not apostles, and yet that did not stand in the way of accepting Mark and Luke as equally inspired with Matthew and John.” (Pg. 110)

Like all collections of diverse essays, this one is admittedly somewhat “uneven.” But Bruce’s scholarship is of the highest grade as always, and his explanations for a “popular” audience will be of help to many or most persons seriously studying the Bible. ~ Stephen H. Propp, Amazon Review, accessed 7/27/2019

About the Author

FF BruceFrederick Fyvie Bruce FBA (12 October 1910 – 11 September 1990), usually cited as F. F. Bruce, was a biblical scholar who supported the historical reliability of the New Testament. His first book, New Testament Documents: Are They Reliable? (1943), was voted by the American evangelical periodical Christianity Today in 2006 as one of the top 50 books “which had shaped evangelicals”.[1]

Bruce was born in Elgin, Moray, Scotland, the son of a Christian Brethren (Plymouth Brethren) preacher and educated at the University of Aberdeen, Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, and the University of Vienna, where he studied with Paul Kretschmer, an Indo-European philologist.[2]

After teaching Greek for several years, first at the University of Edinburgh and then at the University of Leeds, he became head of the Department of Biblical History and Literature at the University of Sheffield in 1947. Aberdeen University bestowed an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree on him in 1957.[3] In 1959 he moved to the University of Manchester where he became Rylands Professor of Biblical Criticism and Exegesis.[4] He wrote over 40 books and served as editor of The Evangelical Quarterly and the Palestine Exploration Quarterly. He retired from teaching in 1978.

Bruce was a scholar on the life and ministry of Paul the Apostle and wrote several studies, the best known of which is Paul: Apostle of the Free Spirit (published in the United States as Paul: Apostle of the Heart Set Free). He also wrote commentaries on many biblical books including Habakkuk, the Gospel of John, the Acts of the Apostles, Romans, 1 & 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Colossians, Philemon, 1 & 2 Thessalonians, Philippians, the Epistle to the Hebrews, and the Epistles of John.

Most of Bruce’s works were scholarly, but he also wrote many popular works on the Bible. He viewed the New Testament writings as historically reliable and the truth claims of Christianity as hinging on their being so. To Bruce this did not mean that the Bible was always precise, or that this lack of precision could not lead to some confusion. He believed, however, that the passages that were still open to debate were ones that had no substantial bearing on Christian theology and thinking. Bruce’s colleague at Manchester, James Barr, considered Bruce a “conservative liberal”.[5]

Bruce was in Christian fellowship at various places during his life, though his primary commitment was to the Open Brethren among whom he grew up.[6] He enjoyed the fellowship and acceptance of this group, though he was very much a maverick in relation to his own personal beliefs. He never accepted a specific brand of dispensationalism[7] usually associated with the Brethren, although he may have held a historic premillennialism[8] akin to George Eldon Ladd[9] and he was also an advocate of the public ministry of women[10] – something that many Plymouth Brethren would still disapprove of today.

Bruce was honoured with two scholarly works by his colleagues and former students, one to mark his 60th and the other to mark his 70th birthday. Apostolic History and the Gospel: Biblical and Historical Essays Presented to F. F. Bruce on his 60th Birthday (1970) included contributions from E. M. Blaiklock, E. Earle Ellis, I. Howard Marshall, Bruce M. Metzger, William Barclay, G. E. Ladd, A. R. Millard, Leon Morris, Bo Reicke, and Donald Guthrie. Pauline Studies: Essays Presented to Professor F. F. Bruce on his 70th Birthday (1980) included contributions from Peter T. O’Brien, David Wenham, Ronald E. Clements, and Moisés Silva. C. F. D. Moule and Robert H. Gundry contributed to both volumes.

Bruce was elected a Fellow of the British Academy, and in 1965 served as President of the Society for Old Testament Study,[11] and also as President of the Society for New Testament Study. ~ Wikipedia

Book Details

Hardcover: 287 pages

Publisher: Fleming H Revell; 3rd ed rev edition (1963)