Archive for July 6th, 2015

July 6, 2015

The Courtyard, Bronze Altar, Priest’s Garments (Exodus 27-28)

Chuck CainOn July 5, 2015 the Adult Sunday School Class reviewed Exodus chapters 27 and 28.

Having completed chapters 25 and 26 which describe the tabernacle structure and its contents, we step outside “heaven” into the tabernacle courtyard depicting “earth.” Here we first encounter the bronze altar on which animal sacrifices will be offered for sins. The design of this altar is described in Exodus 27:1-8. The remainder of this chapter describes the courtyard fencing which is to be 150′ by 75′. Also described is the beautiful gate to the courtyard.

Thus the tabernacle compound has four zones pointing to the holiness of God:

1. The Holy of Holies where God’s glory was to reside above the cherubim of the mercy seat. Only the designated high priest could enter there, and then only once a year on the Day of Atonement with blood.
2. The Holy Place where only the designated priests could enter to service daily the incense altar, the bread table, and the lamp.
3. The courtyard where Israelites could enter to bring their sacrifices to be offered up by the priests.
4. Outside the courtyard would reside the rest of the world, the Gentiles, the uncircumcised, the unbelievers.

In chapter 28 the priests’ garments are described. The high priest is to wear a breastplate, an ephod, a robe, a tunic, a turban, and a sash. Later, underwear will also be described. A detailed description of each garment is provided to Moses. These holy garments are for glory and beauty and point to our High Priest, Jesus Christ.–Chuck Cain

Listen to “The Courtyard, Bronze Altar, Priest’s Garments“ (Exodus 27-28) at mcopc.org.

July 6, 2015

The Valley of Vision

The Valley of Vision CoverStatus: Checked Out

Publisher’s Description

The strength of Puritan character and life lay in prayer and meditation. In this practice the spirit of prayer was regarded as of first importance and the best form of prayer, for living prayer is the characteristic of genuine spirituality. Yet prayer is also vocal and may therefore on occasions be written. Consequently in the Puritan tradition there are many written prayers and meditations which constitute an important corpus of inspiring devotional literature.

Too often ex tempore prayer lacks variety, order and definiteness. The reason for this lies partly in a neglect of due preparation. It is here that the care and scriptural thoroughness which others found necessary in their approach to God may be of help. This book has been prepared not to “supply” prayers but to prompt and encourage the Christian as he treads the path on which others have gone before.

Arthur Bennett

Arthur Bennett

About the Author

Arthur Bennett (1915-1994) was a Canon of St. Albans Cathedral, sometime Rector of Little Munden and Sacombe, Hertfordshire, and was for seventeen years a tutor in Biblical Theology and Christian Doctrine at All Nations Christian College. He died in October 1994 aged 79. Canon Bennett has been highly appreciated across the world for his book of Puritan prayers The Valley of Vision. This title was published by the Trust in 1975 and it has been widely valued ever since. The quiet, devotional ethos of its pages was the ethos in which the author lived. Bennett did not live to see the wide influence the book was to have, particularly in the United States, following his death.

Arthur Bennett was born in Rotherham, Yorkshire, and moved with his family to Barnsley when he was five years old. He left elementary school at the age of thirteen to work as a ‘lather boy’ in his father’s barber’s shop. He gave his life to Christ in his mid-teens at a Salvation Army mission in the town, and became convinced that God wanted him to serve in some form of Christian ministry.

In 1934 he joined the Church of England ‘Church Army,’ and was assigned to what was then the common practice of ‘caravan evangelism,’ becoming a member of a number of teams travelling around Britain. By the mid 1930’s he was spending considerable time in the villages of East Anglia, travelling in a horse-drawn caravan, with other church army cadets and a captain. They worked with the local parish churches and communities to share the gospel. It was while serving in the village of Elmsett, Suffolk, that Arthur met and fell in love with Margarette Jones (from Carmarthenshire in South Wales), who was teaching in the village school.

In 1940 Bennett was accepted by Clifton Theological College, Bristol, and completed a two-year course leading to ordination in the Church of England. That same year (1942), he and Margarette were married in St. Johns Church Pontyberem, Carmarthenshire. In thirty-nine years of ministry Arthur served the parishes of Christ Church, Huddersfield; St Mary’s, Chesham; Gunton, Lowestoft; Christ Church, Ware; and ultimately, through the years 1964-1981, All Saints, Little Munden, Hertfordshire. Through the latter period he was also a Lecturer at All Nations Christian College.

He retired to Clapham, Bedfordshire, but continued his writing and preaching. In 1992 he and Margarette celebrated 50 years of marriage and ministry together. After a short illness Arthur died in 1994 and was buried in the churchyard at Little Munden, Hertfordshire. The inscription on his gravestone reads, ‘Let me find thy joy in my valley.’ Margarette died in 1997 and the inscription ‘In Thy presence is fulness of joy’ was added to the headstone. They left five children and fourteen grandchildren.

At his funeral, the Bishop of St Albans said, ‘Never one to take centre stage, Arthur has always sought to deflect attention from himself to others, and supremely to the Lord Jesus Christ.’ In addition to The Valley of Vision, Arthur Bennett was the author of several titles by other publishers: Rural Evangelism (London: A.R. Mowbray, 1949), Table and Minister (London: Church Bookroom Press, 1963), Travels with a Horse-Drawn Caravan (Worthing: Churchman Publishing, 1989), and Calvary’s Hill (London: Avon Books, 1993).

Book Details

240 Pages
Publisher: Banner of Truth
Publication Date: November, 1975

Source: WTS Books, Banner of Truth Trust

Library patrons who have read this book are invited to share their comments, reviews, questions or criticisms for discussion in the comments below this post.